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Articles on canadian banknotes

This section lists several articles on canadian banknotes.

Examples of post-production defects on canadian banknotes

Examples of post-production defects on canadian banknotes

Canadian banknotes pictures showing examples of post-production defects.


By Lightw4re | Thursday, June 15, 2017

Design and production of canadian bank notes

Design and production of canadian bank notes

It takes several years to design a series of bank notes. Once the designs have been approved, the Bank contracts the printing of the notes to two security printing companies, Canadian Bank Note Company, Limited and BA International Inc. The bank notes are printed 45 to a sheet, cut, and delivered to the Bank.

By Bank of Canada | Friday, February 11, 2011

Accessibility features

Accessibility features

Several features in the Canadian Journey and Birds of Canada bank note series are designed to help blind and visually impaired Canadians recognize bank note denominations either by touch, by sight, or by electronic signal. These design elements are not security features and should not be used to authenticate bank notes.

By Bank of Canada | Friday, February 11, 2011

A New Kind of Money-Playing Cards

A New Kind of Money-Playing Cards

In the late 17th century, the shortage of coinage grew so severe that New France's colonial authorities resorted to issuing a completely new kind of money: playing cards. In 1685, the government had no money to pay the wages of soldiers stationed at Québec.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

A New Issue of Card Money

A New Issue of Card Money

In response to the currency shortage, the King of France authorized a new issue of card money in 1729. Card money was issued until the fall of New France in 1760. Unlike that issued from 1685 to 1714, this card money was printed on ordinary white cardboard, and the size varied by denomination.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

New France, card money, 3 livres, 1749

New France, card money, 3 livres, 1749

In 1685, the French colonial authorities issued the first paper currency in North America. Faced with a shortage of coins with which to pay his troops, De Meulles, the Intendant of New France, introduced as a temporary expedient an issue of paper currency.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

New France: 48 Livres, 1753

New France: 48 Livres, 1753

The French authorities in New France have the distinction of being the first government in North America to issue paper money. Known as card money and first issued in 1685, the notes were an emergency measure that enabled the Intendant to pay his troops before the annual pay ship arrived from France.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada Banking Co., 5 shillings, 1792

Canada Banking Co., 5 shillings, 1792

In the early days of settlement in Canada, any banking services were largely performed by merchants. Following the founding of the Bank of the United States in 1791, interest on the part of merchants in the provision of banking services in Canada increased.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Prince Edward Island, William Fitzpatrick, two shillings, six pence, leather, 1836

Prince Edward Island, William Fitzpatrick, two shillings, six pence, leather, 1836

Prince Edward Island, like the other pre-Confederation British North American colonies, often lacked the small change necessary for transacting business. The need for larger denominations was filled by government treasury notes and notes of the New Brunswick and Nova Scotia banks. One of the ways in which the merchants of the island combatted the lack of change was to issue their own notes.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The Rise of Banks

The Rise of Banks

At the end of the War of 1812, in 1815, the British government redeemed army bills at full value, helping to restore the public's confidence in paper money and setting the scene for the rise of banks in Canada. The new banks issued their own notes, which were guaranteed by their reserves of gold and silver.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The Bank of Upper Canada, $5, 1861

The Bank of Upper Canada, $5, 1861

The note illustrated, dated "1 Jan'y 1861," belongs to the last issue of The Bank of Upper Canada. It reflects the technical advances in security printing of the time, and its design is rich in symbolism.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The International Bank, five dollars 1858

The International Bank, five dollars 1858

Between 1855 and 1859, the Legislature of the Province of Canada recklessly granted bank charters to 24 different applicants. The International Bank of Canada was one of the more dubious of these enterprises - the classic example of a "wildcat bank." It had a valid charter but operated dishonestly by issuing large quantities of notes it had no intention of redeeming.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada's First Notes

Canada's First Notes

Between 1868 and 1869 the Dominion government withdrew from circulation and exported several million U.S. silver coins, which were actually worth only 80 per cent of their face value. This ensured that Canadian coins were the only coinage in use in Canada. Waiting for the 1870 series of coins to arrive from England, the central government resorted to issuing 25-cent notes.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Bank of London, five dollars, 1883

Bank of London, five dollars, 1883

The five-dollar note illustrated was issued by the Bank of London in Canada, which operated from 1883 to 1887. The bank's demise in 1887 marked the end of the long and frenzied financial career of its president, Henry Taylor. Up until 1887, the bank had conducted an uneventful but prosperous business, establishing branches throughout southwestern Ontario.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The Bank of Canada

The Bank of Canada

It was also during the 1930s - in 1935, to be precise - that Canada opened its own central bank, the Bank of Canada. This institution, whose original head office constructed in 1937 you see here, was given a mandate to regulate the country's money supply and to ensure the efficient operation of the Canadian economy.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

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