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This section lists several articles on canadian coins.

Die clash possibilities

Die clash possibilities

To help you to identify die clash on canadian coins, here's a list of images that show you obverses and reverses die clash possibilities.

By castor | Thursday, October 9, 2008

Vancouver 2010 - Olympic Coins

Vancouver 2010 - Olympic Coins

Find out all coins of the three year program of circulation and collector coins in honour of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

By Lightw4re | Friday, September 12, 2008

5 cents 1964 - Extra Water Line

5 cents 1964 - Extra Water Line

Even if there are a lot of errors and varieties on the 5 cents 1964, like the whistling queen, the most popular is and will always be the Extra Water Line (XWL) in front of the beaver.

By Lightw4re | Monday, September 8, 2008

Terry Fox Dollar Varieties

Terry Fox Dollar Varieties

Find the varieties of the Terry Fox 2005 dollar with images of several zones on this coin. Here's the list of varieties : Normal (grass), without trees, half grass, no grass./p>

By La Loutre | Saturday, August 30, 2008

Currency Museum of the Bank of Canada

Currency Museum of the Bank of Canada

The National Currency Collection contains some 100,000 items consisting of coins, tokens and paper money in the custody of, or owned by, the Bank of Canada. It includes a relatively complete collection of the coins, tokens and of paper money that have been used or are now being used in Canada. The purpose of the collection is to portray the development of money through the ages with particular emphasis on the history of Canada's currency.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Pre-European Contact

Pre-European Contact

Before the arrival of the Europeans in the early 16th century, Canada was inhabited by its First Nations. They did not use currency but traded in goods and services on a barter basis. Certain objects, however, were regarded as having special economic and social value.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Early European Contact and the Fur Trade

Early European Contact and the Fur Trade

Among the First Nations of the east, wampum was most often used to measure wealth and for gift-giving. The wampum belt you see on the screen is made of small cylindrical shells strung together. In addition to being used as a means of payment, wampum belts also had ceremonial uses, such as the marking of peace treaties, the summoning of the various nations to war, or the recording of important events in the history of the people.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Trade Silver - The Beaver

Trade Silver - The Beaver

The North American First Nations for many years made ornaments of bone, shell and stone. The coming of the Europeans introduced them to ornaments made of brass, copper and silver. The early French fur traders soon learned that the Aboriginals were more than willing to exchange their furs for metal ornaments, especially silver.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The Shortage of Coins

The Shortage of Coins

The colonists living in New France from the mid-1660s on used barter to exchange goods but also used metal coins, such as this 15-sol French coin dated 1670. However, there was never enough hard currency to go around.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The Coin Shortage Continues

The Coin Shortage Continues

By 1720, the King of France decided to ban the practice of issuing playing card money. The colony's inhabitants were forced to make do with coinage supplied from France, such as the 30-deniers coin known as a mousquetaire because its cross resembled that adorning the capes of the famous musketeers.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

France, Louis XV, 9 deniers, 1721-22

France, Louis XV, 9 deniers, 1721-22

There was a chronic shortage of currency in New France throughout the French Regime; coins brought out from the mother country returned almost immediately to France. Governor after governor pleaded with the French king to provide distinctive coins that would remain in the colony because they would be unacceptable in France.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

France: Nine-Deniers, Copper, 1722 H

France: Nine-Deniers, Copper, 1722 H

The copper coin illustrated is one of a colonial issue that the Company of the Indies, a private French trading company, imported into New France under the authorization of Louis XV. The colonists, however, were reluctant to use the new coinage because of their previous experience with depreciation of copper coins.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

France, Louis XV, copper sol, 1719

France, Louis XV, copper sol, 1719

Copper coins were not widely used in New France for a large part of its 150-year history. The reason for this apparent anomaly was a distrust of copper coinage that developed early in the commercial life of the colony.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

France, Louis XV, 1 livre, 1720BB

France, Louis XV, 1 livre, 1720BB

John Law was a Scottish banker who emigrated to France and became financial adviser to Louis XV. He eventually gave King Louis ample reason to wish that the Scot had never left his native land. Law recommended the establishment of La Banque Royale which became commonly known as La Banque de Law.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

France, Louis XV, double sol (sou marqué), 1741B

France, Louis XV, double sol (sou marqué), 1741B

During the French regime in Canada the need for higher denominations of currency was filled by paper money. The lowest denomination of this paper money, however, was 7 sols 6 deniers.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The Spanish-American Dollar

The Spanish-American Dollar

The British colonial period did not mean an end to the shortage of coinage. The economy was still extremely dependent on the fur trade, and any coins arriving from England immediately found their way back.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Prince Edward Island, <em>holey dollar</em>, 1804

Prince Edward Island, holey dollar, 1804

Upon his arrival in P.E.I. in 1813, Charles Douglass Smith, the island's newly appointed lieutenant-governor, discovered that there was a serious shortage of circulating coin. Although Spanish coins, mainly the dollars or 8-reale pieces, occasionally found their way to the island in trade, they rarely remained in circulation because they were used to pay for imported goods.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The Move to the Decimal System

The Move to the Decimal System

During the 1850s, trade burgeoned between the United States and the colonies of British North America. The British colonies, led by the Province of Canada, became convinced that they needed to replace the sterling system, which had been used since 1760, with the decimal system used in the United States.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Province of Canada, Victoria, one cent, 1858-1859

Province of Canada, Victoria, one cent, 1858-1859

All of the British North American colonies originally had currency systems based on pounds, shillings and pence, though foreign coins circulated widely. By the 1850s, however, growing trade with the United States and the widespread use of U.S. and certain Spanish-American coins led the colonies to seek adoption of decimal currency systems with dollar, cent and mil units.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The Province of Canada, which existed as a political entity from 1841 to 1867 and consisted of what are now Ontario and Quebec, was the first part of British North America to adopt the familiar decimal system of currency by an act passed in 1857.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

New Brunswick, one-half cent, 1861

New Brunswick, one-half cent, 1861

Perhaps the most curious of all the decimal coins of the British North American provinces is the New Brunswick half cent. It was never ordered, nor indeed even required, by the colony! In 1859-60 both New Brunswick and Nova Scotia adopted a decimal currency system. The Nova Scotia government, however, wished to keep British silver in circulation as well.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

New Brunswick, Victoria, 10 cents, 1864

New Brunswick, Victoria, 10 cents, 1864

The decimal coinage issued by the Province of Canada in 1858 brought some semblance of order to the chaotic scramble for small change that was usual in the colonies. Since people had been using English and American coins as well as local tokens in their everyday transactions, the new currency was welcome.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Prince Edward Island, one cent, 1871

Prince Edward Island, one cent, 1871

Prince Edward Island was the last of the British North American colonies to adopt a decimal system of currency. 'Going decimal' in 1871, the island chose a dollar equal in value to the United States one-dollar gold piece, in line with the decimal currency system introduced earlier in the Provinces of Canada and New Brunswick and adopted by the Dominion of Canada in 1867.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Newfoundland, one cent, 1872H

Newfoundland, one cent, 1872H

Newfoundland, a separate British colony, was allowed to issue its own coinage beginning in 1865. The lowest denomination issued was the one cent, which was one inch in diameter and made of bronze. The design of this coin was the subject of some discussion between colonial and home office authorities.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Newfoundland, one cent, 1938

Newfoundland, one cent, 1938

Newfoundland had had its own currency since 1865 and over the years the people became very attached to their large one-cent pieces, an inch in diameter, and to their "fish scales," as the small silver five-cent pieces were locally known.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Newfoundland, five cents, 1947C

Newfoundland, five cents, 1947C

John Cabot is given credit for the discovery of Newfoundland in 1497, although many believe that the Vikings were there hundreds of years earlier. By 1583 the English had firmly established their rule over the island, and Newfoundland remained a British colony until 1949, when it entered Confederation as the tenth province of Canada.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Newfoundland, two dollars, 1870

Newfoundland, two dollars, 1870

Like all other British North American colonies, Newfoundland adopted, in the mid-19th century, a decimal currency consisting of dollars-cents-mils. However, in introducing the new currency in 1865, Newfoundland, unlike other colonies, chose to include a gold coin among the denominations it was issuing.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

British Columbia, 20 dollars, 1862

British Columbia, 20 dollars, 1862

In the late 1850s, gold was discovered in the Fraser River and Cariboo districts of British Columbia. The gold rush that followed brought a large influx of new inhabitants, changing the colony virtually overnight from a small settlement based on trading to a rapidly expanding one. The almost complete lack of a circulating medium occasioned great inconvenience.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada's First Coinage

Canada's First Coinage

With the creation of the Dominion of Canada in 1867, the central government assumed responsibility for money and banking, as mandated under section 91 of the British North America Act, and it undertook to standardize the fledgling country's currency.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, one cent, Palmers Pond wreck (January 26, 1897)

Canada, one cent, Palmers Pond wreck (January 26, 1897)

Coins have often been used, officially and unofficially, to commemorate important events. This counterstamped one-cent piece is an example of an unofficial use to mark an event of local significance. On January 26, 1897, a CPR train on its way from Halifax to Saint John was a few minutes late leaving Sackville. It was scheduled to arrive in Moncton at noon.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, 10 cents, 1936 dot

Canada, 10 cents, 1936 dot

In Canadian coinage, some of the more interesting varieties - differences within a given coin issue - occurred in connection with the abdication of King Edward VIII.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, 50 cents, 1921

Canada, 50 cents, 1921

Canada's 1921 fifty-cent piece is a very rare coin; fewer than 200 are believed to exist. This is a direct result of the great variation in demand for fifty-cent pieces since their introduction in Canada in 1870. At times the coins were very popular; at other times, as in recent years, they were seldom seen in circulation.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, 10 dollars (gold), 1912

Canada, 10 dollars (gold), 1912

During the first 40 years of its existence, the Dominion of Canada had no gold coinage of its own although various foreign gold coins, notably British sovereigns and several United States denominations, were used.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, 10 dollars (bronze pattern), 1928

Canada, 10 dollars (bronze pattern), 1928

In 1927 the Dominion authorities requested that the Royal Mint in London prepare new reverse dies for Canada's gold coinage. A new coat of arms had been approved for the Dominion in 1921, and it was felt that if, in the future, Canada should decide to issue another series of gold coins, everything would be in readiness.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, five cents, 1922

Canada, five cents, 1922

Canada is justly proud of her role as a world leader in nickel production. The value of nickel as a coinage metal has been recognized for many years; not only is it attractive but it is also tough enough to withstand the wear and tear of commercial use for long periods.The use of nickel for Canadian coins dates back to 1922, when the first large five-cent piece was introduced.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

The First Attempt to Canadianize Coinage

The First Attempt to Canadianize Coinage

The depiction of a canoe on the 1935 silver dollar marked the first attempt to "Canadianize" the designs on the country's coinage. In 1937 a completely new set of coins was issued with designs highlighting themes drawn from Canadian wildlife and flora. These designs, including the famous beaver on the 5-cent coin, grace our coins to this day.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, five cents, 1953

Canada, five cents, 1953

In 1951, during the Korean War, Canada was faced with a shortage of nickel, which had traditionally been used in producing the five-cent piece. To deal with this problem, the Royal Canadian Mint reverted to a solution which had been found during the Second World War. It struck five-cent pieces in steel and plated them with chromium.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, 50 cents, 1947ML

Canada, 50 cents, 1947ML

The coin illustrated is part of the Canadian series designed after the death of King George V. The reigning monarch, George V1, appears on the obverse of all the coins, and the fifty-cent piece features the Canadian coat of arms on its reverse.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

World War II

World War II

As in World War I, the metallic composition of coinage had to be altered during World War II. Owing to the increased demand for nickel from the war-related industries, the government decided to mint the 5-cent coin from tombac, an alloy of zinc and copper with a colour similar to that of a penny.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, five cents (tombac), 1943

Canada, five cents (tombac), 1943

During the Second World War, Canadian nickel was in great demand as a war material. This forced the temporary abandonment of its use in the coining of five-cent pieces. The first substitute material employed was a type of brass, called tombac. To aid in distinguishing them from the bronze one-cent coins, the new yellow five-cent pieces were given a dodecagonal or 12-sided, shape.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Changes in Coin Design

Changes in Coin Design

More than simply the design and composition of Canadian coins have changed over the years. The images of the king or queen have had to change to reflect new circumstances. The portrait of the king or queen has always appeared on our coinage. In 1953, Elizabeth II, the new head of state, made her first appearance on Canadian coins and in 1954, on bank notes.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, Edward VII , 25 cents, 1908

Canada, Edward VII , 25 cents, 1908

Monarchs or heads of state have been a common motif on western coins since ancient times. Five sovereigns have appeared on Canadian coins since Confederation. The second, Edward VII, is portrayed on the silver 25-cent piece of 1908 pictured.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, George V, 25 cents, 1911

Canada, George V, 25 cents, 1911

With the accession of George V to the British throne in 1910, it became necessary for the Royal Mint in London to produce a set of master tools for the obverse of the new Canadian coins. For the first time the regal portrait for the coins was produced by an artist outside the Mint.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, Elizabeth II, one dollar, 1990

Canada, Elizabeth II, one dollar, 1990

The one-dollar coin featured bears the third portrait of Queen Elizabeth II to appear on Canadian coins. This portrait, introduced in 1990, represents a significant milestone in the history of Canadian coinage, as it is the first portrait of the reigning monarch to be designed by a Canadian.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, one dollar, 1939

Canada, one dollar, 1939

This coin, the second commemorative silver dollar struck in Canada, was minted to celebrate the visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in 1939. The reverse of the coin depicts the Parliament buildings in Ottawa. The Latin legend FIDE SUORUM REGNAT (He reigns by the faith of his people) appears above.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, one dollar, 1949

Canada, one dollar, 1949

Although it is now a fairly common practice, the use of our coinage to commemorate a special event was relatively rare prior to the 1960s. The principal coin used for commemorative purposes has been the dollar. One of the most attractive of these coins is the one issued nearly thirty years ago to mark the entry of Newfoundland into Confederation.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, one dollar, 1958

Canada, one dollar, 1958

This silver dollar, with its bold design of mountains behind a totem pole typical of Pacific coast Native Canadians, marks the centennial of British Columbia's establishment as a Crown Colony. In the early 1840s what is now British Columbia was part of the Oregon country and was controlled by the Hudson's Bay Company.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

Canada, 20 dollars (gold), 1967

Canada, 20 dollars (gold), 1967

Very few gold coins have been struck in Canada, even though gold was widely used throughout the world as a medium of exchange until the early years of this century. Canada issued $5 and $10 gold pieces in 1912, 1913 and 1914 and British sovereigns were struck at The Royal Mint in Ottawa from 1908 to 1919.

By Library and Archives Canada | Monday, March 29, 2004

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