Accumulations on 1935 Canadian silver dollar

Hot Brass
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 8:59 am
Location: Ontario,Canada

Accumulations on 1935 Canadian silver dollar

Postby Hot Brass » Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:13 pm

Hi: I have two 1935 Canadian George V silver dollars which have some accumulations on the reverse. Do these accumulations add any value to a coin in any way?
Also,there were 428,700 plus minted,how many of these accumulation varieties would there be out there?(guesstimate?)Thanks,Huck50

Image
Image

willbrooks
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2013 8:22 am

Re: Accumulations on 1935 Canadian silver dollar

Postby willbrooks » Sat Apr 27, 2013 10:38 pm

I'm not sure if you use the same terminology in your country, but in the US, we call this machine doubling. A slight bounce during the strike flattens out part of the device. You can tell because of the flat, shelf-like appearance and also how the "doubling" cuts into the device rather than adding to it, like a doubled die would.

Hot Brass
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 8:59 am
Location: Ontario,Canada

Re: Accumulations on 1935 Canadian silver dollar

Postby Hot Brass » Sun Apr 28, 2013 6:18 am

willbrooks wrote:I'm not sure if you use the same terminology in your country, but in the US, we call this machine doubling. A slight bounce during the strike flattens out part of the device. You can tell because of the flat, shelf-like appearance and also how the "doubling" cuts into the device rather than adding to it, like a doubled die would.

Thanks! Being a newbie and finding that particular 'defect',basically on my first coin, thought I had found something unique,but after looking around on this site at the many different varieties and errors.......this accumulation of mine is nothin! Thanks,Hot Brass
Last edited by Hot Brass on Mon Apr 29, 2013 9:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

verdigris
Posts: 227
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:51 am

Re: Accumulations on 1935 Canadian silver dollar

Postby verdigris » Sun Apr 28, 2013 11:54 am

Will wrote:I'm not sure if you use the same terminology in your country, but in the US, we call this machine doubling. A slight bounce during the strike flattens out part of the device. You can tell because of the flat, shelf-like appearance and also how the "doubling" cuts into the device rather than adding to it, like a doubled die would.
Brass wrote:.. after looking aroung on this site at the many different varieties and errors.....

Here, it's refered to as die shift although I believe machine doubling is generally understood. ...I think we're talking the same thing, no? http://www.coinsandcanada.com/coins-err ... hift&id=14


Cheers

willbrooks
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2013 8:22 am

Re: Accumulations on 1935 Canadian silver dollar

Postby willbrooks » Sun Apr 28, 2013 3:59 pm

verdigris wrote:Here, it's refered to as die shift although I believe machine doubling is generally understood. ...I think we're talking the same thing, no? http://www.coinsandcanada.com/coins-err ... hift&id=14


Cheers


Thank you for the link. Yes, that is exactly what I am referring to. It is common here in the states.


Return to “1 dollar”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest