Coins and Canada - Errors and varieties of canadian coins

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Errors and varieties of canadian coins

Canadian coins contains many errors and varieties. Sometimes, it increases the value of the coin with one of the type below. These errors and varieties are caused by several factors durant the production process. Through images and descriptions in the section, it allows you to identify and classify several types of errors and varieties.

1. Die Crack

Stamp of one or more cracks visible in relief on a coin struck by a die that has a crack more or less pronounced. The crack on the piece can be superficial (only the part chrome plated) or pronounced, demonstrating a certain depth.

More information on die crack »

Example(s) de die crack

1 cent 1894
1 cent 1894

25 cents 1992 - Yukon
25 cents 1992 - Yukon

2. Retained Broken Die

This is one of the categories of die cracks. For this categorie, the crack must reach the rim in two different places on the coin. A slope can be found on the field of the coin, but it's not always the case. To conclude that the broken part is retained, it must include a portion of the design and/or legend. Otherwise, it's a Cuds.

More information on retained broken die »

Example(s) de retained broken die

5 cents 1944
5 cents 1944

5 cents 1945
5 cents 1945

3. Cuds

This error is in the same family as die crack.

The broken die is distinct, because it occurs only on the rim and may contaminate the field. However, to be called a Cuds, it needs to start from the rim.

More information on cuds »

Example(s) de cuds

50 cents 1940
50 cents 1940

5 cents 1981 P - US
5 cents 1981 P - US

4. Die Chip

Die chips are small pieces of metal in relief, and who are not part of the original drawing. Appearing most often in places where the pressure is stronger, for exemples the edge of letters, numbers and parts of the drawing where the space between the various elements of the design is fairly small.

More information on die chip »

Example(s) de die chip

5 cents 1957
5 cents 1957

5. Accumulations

Accumulations are a group of die chips.

More information on accumulations »

Example(s) de accumulations

5 cents 2001 P
5 cents 2001 P

6. Dots

Dots are usually die chips. They are small chips at different locations that become points (dots) on the coin.

More information on dots »

Example(s) de dots

25 cents 1999
25 cents 1999

5 cents 1946
5 cents 1946

7. Extra Metal

This error can be identified with extra metal on reverse.

More information on extra metal »

Example(s) de extra metal

1 cent 1980
1 cent 1980

1 cent 1994
1 cent 1994

8. Filling

Coins with extra metal in relief, which the texture has the appearance of sandpaper.

More information on filling »

Example(s) de filling

1 cent 1979
1 cent 1979

5 cents 1975
5 cents 1975

25 cents 1943
25 cents 1943

9. Mortar Set

It's the result of Deteriorated Die | Die Deterioration Doubling, when the die met or exceeded its useful life stage.

More information on mortar set »

Example(s) de mortar set

1 cent 1947
1 cent 1947

5 cents 1944
5 cents 1944

10. Die clash

Die clashes are marks on the dies by their clashing. Die clashes occurs when the press is active and that there are no blanks between them. After the clash, all coins minted with this same die will present these marks.

The marks correspond to the contour of the pattern and/or the legend on the other side of the coin. Because the dies are not always replaced at the same time, we do not find necessarily marks on both sides of the coin.

More information on die clash »

Example(s) de die clash

1 cent 1963
1 cent 1963

5 cents 1950
5 cents 1950

1 dollar 1950
1 dollar 1950

11. Deteriorated Die | Die Deterioration Doubling

This error represents a doubling due to a deterioration of dies.

More information on deteriorated die | die deterioration doubling »

Example(s) de deteriorated die | die deterioration doubling

1 cent 1979
1 cent 1979

12. Harp

The Harp error is represented by 5 lines of different lengths that start from the 1 of 1 cent and go down near the maple leaf. Only the second line reches the leaf and the others are not complete. This error exists only on the 1 cent 1962.

More information on harp »

Example(s) de harp

1 cent 1962
1 cent 1962

13. Guitar

The Harp error is represented by 5 lines of different lengths that start from the 1 of 1 cent and go down to the maple leaf. All lines reaches the leaf. This error exists only on the 1 cent 1962.

More information on guitar »

Example(s) de guitar

1 cent 1962
1 cent 1962

14. Die shift

This error shows a doubling that occurs while striking.

More information on die shift »

Example(s) de die shift

5 cents 1965
5 cents 1965

5 cents 1974
5 cents 1974

15. Spacing of numbers

The error Spacing of numbers is a repunched die.

More information on spacing of numbers »

Example(s) de spacing of numbers

1 cent 1893
1 cent 1893

16. Shapes of Numbers

The error Spacing of numbers is a repunched die.

More information on shapes of numbers »

Example(s) de shapes of numbers

1 cent 1947
 1 cent 1947

17. Repunched Die

A repunched die is a coin already created with numbers added later.

More information on repunched die »

Example(s) de repunched die

50 cents 1947
50 cents 1947

18. Incomplete Letters

This error has letters incomplete and it was common on coins of the 19th century.

More information on incomplete letters »

Example(s) de incomplete letters

1 cent 1876 H
1 cent 1876 H

19. Filled Die

This error described a coin with some parts missing.

More information on filled die »

Example(s) de filled die

1 cent 1940
1 cent 1940

20. Weak Strike

Weak strike describe a coin with an incomplete relief.

More information on weak strike »

Example(s) de weak strike

1 cent 1963
1 cent 1963

5 cents 1960
5 cents 1960

50 cents 1974
50 cents 1974

21. Mule

This is a coin struck with two different die that were not intended to be used together.

More information on mule »

Example(s) de mule

25 cents 1999
25 cents 1999

22. Deficient Plating

Plating process is the last step before the strike. Electrodeposition is a chemical process which leaves a very thin layer on the surface of a blank. It only takes a small error when cleaning blanks and it will appear on the coin struck. In 1944-45 blanks without the chrome plating were punched by mistake. Since the new plating process, there are more and more coins with this defect.

More information on deficient plating »

Example(s) de deficient plating

5 cents 1944
5 cents 1944

23.1. Die Damage

Die damage is the result of a mark made on the die, during its manufacture or maintenance.

More information on die damage »

Example(s) de die damage

25 cents 1992
25 cents 1992

1 cent 1985 - US
1 cent 1985 - US

23.2. Die Damage by Hub

This error is the result of accidental contact between the die unhardened and the hub. The marks leaved by this contact show parts of the drawing, which are more or less skewed compared to the original design, on the coin.

More information on die damage by hub »

Example(s) de die damage by hub

25 cents
25 cents

24. Rotated Die

This error can be caused by two reasons :

  • One of the die was improperly aligned during the installation
  • One of the die was too slack during the striking process and turned on its axis

There are regularly rotated coins in circulation. Pivoting movements of less than fifteen degrees are in the standards mint and have no added value.

More information on rotated die »

Example(s) de rotated die

25 cents 1967
25 cents 1967

25. Misaligned Die

On a misaligned die, there's a side (normally the reverse) more or less offset.

More information on misaligned die »

Example(s) de misaligned die

1 dollar 1995
1 dollar 1995

5 cents 1975
5 cents 1975

26. Clipped Planchet

It's an incomplete coin which has not fallen into the scrap bin when it passed on the vibrating sieve.

More information on clipped planchet »

Example(s) de clipped planchet

5 cents 1973
5 cents 1973

27. Flaw Planchet

A flaw planchet means there's an error on the planchet that was used to make the blanks before striking them.

More information on flaw planchet »

Example(s) de flaw planchet

1 cent 1947
1 cent 1947

1 cent 1890 H
1 cent 1890 H

1 cent 1954
1 cent 1954

28. Blank

Type #1: Without rimming

The blank coin without rimming is rarer than the type #2 (with rimming). The type #1 have no borders on the perimeter. Furthermore, its diameter is larger than the original.

Type #2: With rimming

On this type, the border is visible around the blank.

More information on blank »

Example(s) de blank

1 cent
1 cent

29. Retarded Coin

More information on retarded coin »

Example(s) de retarded coin

1 cent 1979
1 cent 1979

30. Rippled Coin

More information on rippled coin »

Example(s) de rippled coin

1 cent 1957
1 cent 1957

1 cent 1980
1 cent 1980

31.1. Partial Brockage

More information on partial brockage »

Example(s) de partial brockage

1 cent 1962
1 cent 1962

31.2. Full Brockage

More information on full brockage »

Example(s) de full brockage

25 cents
25 cents - Brockage

1 cent - Brockage

32. Doubled Die

More information on doubled die »

Example(s) de doubled die

1 cent 1962
1 cent 1962

50 cents 1952
50 cents 1952

33. Struck through Grease

More information on struck through grease »

Example(s) de struck through grease

1 cent 2003 P
1 cent 2003 P

34.1. Partial collar

More information on partial collar »

Example(s) de partial collar

1 cent 1978
1 cent 1978

34.2. Uncentred broadstrike

More information on uncentred broadstrike »

Example(s) de uncentred broadstrike

1 cent 1978
1 cent 1978

1 cent 1969
1 cent 1969

35. Wrong planchet

More information on wrong planchet »

Example(s) de wrong planchet

1 cent 1978
1 cent 1978

36. Incomplete Clip

More information on incomplete clip »

Example(s) de incomplete clip

1 cent 1962
1 cent 1962

37.1. Double struck : reverse on reverse

More information on double struck : reverse on reverse »

Example(s) de double struck : reverse on reverse

1 cent 1969
1 cent 1969

1 cent 1969
1 cent 1969

37.2. Double struck : reverse on obverse

More information on double struck : reverse on obverse »

Example(s) de double struck : reverse on obverse

1 cent 1969 - Avers sur revers
1 cent 1969 - Avers sur revers

1 cent 1969 - Revers sur avers
1 cent 1969 - Revers sur avers

38. Die Cap

More information on die cap »

Example(s) de die cap

10 cents 1965

39. Indented Strike

More information on indented strike »

Example(s) de indented strike

1 cent
1 cent

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